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The Fatigue Insider Blog

Goodbye 2018, hello 2019!

Dec 19, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

As 2018 draws to a close I wanted to send out a personal thank you.

Along with the rest of the Integrated Safety Support team, I appreciate your ongoing interest in our work, which this year has again taken us far and wide to places including Vietnam, India, Singapore, Brazil, Columbia, Portugal, Spain, the United Kingdom as well as Australia & New Zealand.

As automation and other technologies change how workforces are best used and kept safe, our most sought-after offerings range from basics (e.g. online training courses) to complex strategic advice on how to manage human risks within change programs.

If there are any 2019+ priorities that you would like to talk with us about please contact me. We also look forward to (hopefully) seeing you at our flagship event in Singapore during the 12th to 14th of March. The theme of the event is Fatigue Management & Human Factors in our 24-hour Society and information about it can be found at the fully updated event page. 

We are running a December discount offering 25% off all tickets for our blog readers (with the exception of student tickets). Please use the promotion code FatigueInsider in the site (noting that the code is case sensitive and there is no space between the two words). Don’t forget to share the code with your friends and colleagues.

Yours sincerely, Dr Adam Fletcher & the team from Integrated Safety Support.

Don't forget to contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.



 

 

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Sleeping under the midnight sun

Dec 12, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Humans are diurnal, meaning we are normally programmed to sleep during the night and are active during the day (unlike our koala friends). Our circadian rhythm is regulated through our optic nerves. Our bodies are signalled to stay awake when light enters our eyes and triggers communication via our optic nerves. When light wanes and we enter darkness, our brains are prompted to produce and release the sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. Without darkness, our body doesn’t know when to produce/release melatonin. 

So what happens when you're exposed to constant light?

The summer solstice in Australia is fast approaching. However, unlike our clients and friends in the northern hemisphere, we don't get to experience perpetual daylight during summer! In places like Scandinavia, their summer break allows for fun and excitement after long, cold and dark winters. But being exposed to light when one should normally be experiencing a nocturnal period, can lead to sleep deprivation and other sleep-related health issues. This seems to be more of an issue for us as visitors than it is for the locals. We can definitely vouch that the lack of darkness completely threw our sense of time out the window. If it wasn’t for block-out curtains, eye masks and melatonin there is no doubt a zombie transformation would have occurred!

For those in the southern hemisphere, enjoy your summer downtime! And for our friends in the north, your time in the sun will come (in precisely 6 months!).

For more information on light and circadian rhythms, read our previous blog posts here:

 


 


 

 

 

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How much sleep do you need?

Dec 05, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Our bodies are all different, and the same rings true for our circadian rhythms. Some of us tend to be morning people, able to be wide awake and functioning at the crack of dawn. Whereas some of us tend to be night owls, able to stay up until the late hours of the night (or early morning!). However, when it comes to how much sleep one actually requires to optimally function, the range is not as big.

In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation issued its new recommendations for appropriate sleep durations all age groups.


When calculating what time to go to bed, it really comes down to your circadian rhythm. Individual’s circadian rhythm could differentiate by hours. If two people were to both go to bed at the same time, one could be sleeping at the perfect biological time and the other at an adverse biological time. Unfortunately, the easiest and best way to measure this is by testing melatonin levels through blood or saliva samples. The quality of your sleep heavily depends on the timing of sleep relative to your circadian rhythm. If you sleep at the right biological time, you'll get optimal recovery sleep. However, when you are sleeping at a non-optimal time, the quality of sleep reduces. An extreme example of this is when the circadian rhythm is disrupted, for example when jet lagged or working shift.

Our bodies respond well to routine. If you manage to find a bedtime that works best for you and achieve the amount of sleep your body requires, you might just find yourself waking up a couple of minutes before your alarm is scheduled to go off!

Join us in Singapore for our Fatigue Management & Human Factors in our 24-hour Society event in March 2019 to find out more about sleep and fatigue management. Click here for tickets and more information.

We are running a December discount offering 25% off all tickets for our blog readers (with the exception of student tickets). Please use the promotion code FatigueInsider in the site (noting that the code is case sensitive and there is no space between the two words). Don’t forget to share the code with your friends and colleagues.

Alternatively, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.


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