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The Fatigue Insider Blog

Fatigued cabin crew

Oct 03, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

The airline industry is a growing 24/7 operation, boasting an estimated 39 million flights to be flown worldwide by the end of 2018. Flying passengers across the country, or even across the globe, can create a variety of different challenges for cabin crew, including extended duty periods, highly variable schedules, possible frequent time zone changes, and increased passenger loads.

A study has shown a link between the job characteristics of cabin crew and fatigue. The graph below is an indication of the main work factors that contribute to fatigue amongst cabin crew workers, according to union representatives. Long hours and lack of rest are seen as the main offenders.


 

Other factors that may contribute to cabin crew fatigue include, but are not limited to:

  • Consecutive duty days
  • Length of layovers
  • Timezone changes
  • Delays
  • Availability for breaks
  • Availability of a healthy meal
  • Passenger disruption
  • Aircraft type swaps

In 2016, a bill was pass that requires airlines to provide cabin crew with a minimum 10-hour rest period between shifts, matching the requirement for pilots. The bill also included a requirement for cabin crew to be included in Fatigue Risk Management Systems, which until that point was only applied to pilots.

In Australia, there are currently no civil aviation regulations governing duty times and rest requirements for cabin crew. Their duty limitations are set contractually, and minimum standards are set by the country in which the cabin crew are employed. Cabin crew are our first responders to a safety event - is it time they are included in fatigue regulations?

 

For more information on cabin crew fatigue, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Avoiding travel burnout

Sep 19, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Here at ISS, we are often on the road (or in the air) travelling to meet and work with our clients. As much as our friends and family may be jealous of our frequent travels, we all know full well that it’s not a holiday! For those who travel for work, as much as we may love it, there's is no denying that travelling can be exhausting - we're yet to hear from someone who loves unpacking and repacking!

So what do we do to keep travel burnout at bay?

  • Keep up our healthy habits - Maintaining a healthy diet & increasing our hydration is really important. We often carry protein-packed snacks and keep our fluids up by drinking 1above.
  • Use supplements and equipment to help us with jet lag - we're big on using things such as melatonin, personal humidifier masks and light therapy glasses so we can hit the ground running without jet lag hitting us too hard.
  • Exercise - We always pack our joggers! It's good to get out and get some fresh air and vitamin D. This also really helps with jet lag.
  • Attempt to become a local - Before we head to our new destination, we like to research things like a go-to coffee shop, the closest gym and best places to work from remotely. This helps to feel more at home, without having to scramble to find things once we arrive. 
  • Plan our flights - Where possible, we always try to travel the most direct route. It can be very tiring having multiple and/or long layovers.
  • Take a break - It's really important to get some downtime, especially with friends and family, to feel refreshed and ready to go.
For more information on avoiding fatigue while travelling, click on the links below to some of our previous blog posts, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.

Around the world in... 52 hours?

Melatonin - should you use it?

Beware of the dark side: using light to reduce jet lag

High & dry: keeping hydrated while flying

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The age of automation

Mar 07, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

The age of automation is upon us. Whether you like it or not, your car will eventually be driving you home from work and your fridge will be ordering avocados from the store because it knows Monday is Mexican night and your tacos must have guacamole!

The advancements in artificial intelligence, robotics, internet technologies and cloud computing are increasing at a rapid rate. In aviation, automation technology has in fact been around for decades and was introduced to increase precision and economy of operations while reducing pilot workload and training requirements. The aim was not to replace the pilot but to reduce the number of human-related errors.

Automation developments are creating workplaces of the future in which people have more time to think and do, while devices run and gather data to complete jobs in quicker time than originally thought possible. Automation is bringing significant advantages in safety and productivity for organisations.

For more information on automation, contact us via Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or comment below. 

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Around the world in... 52 hours?

Feb 09, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

The team at ISS are seasoned travellers, working with clients and attending events around the globe. We may have a few around the world trips under our belts, however we certainly aren’t breaking any records like Andrew Fisher.

Andrew, an airline executive, recently circled the globe, flying 3 different airlines in a record-breaking 52 hours and 34 minutes. His trip begun in Shanghai, where he boarded a flight to Auckland, then Buenos Aires and Amsterdam before returning to Shanghai.

Having been in transit for a short total of 5.5 hours, Andrew admitted that travelling continuously is emotionally and physically taxing. When we are travelling long distances, we like to:

  • Plan our trip in a westerly direction where possible
  • Give ourselves enough downtime to shift our circadian clock once we arrive at our final destination
  • Use light and melatonin to help shift our circadian clock
  • Keep hydrated throughout our journey

For more information and tips on travelling, contact us via Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or comment below.

 

 


 

 

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High & dry: Keeping hydrated while flying

Sep 15, 2017 ISS Comments (0)

Have you ever taken off on a quick getaway intending to come home relaxed, only to get home feeling exhausted?

Air travel can significantly contribute to fatigue, due to dehydration (and also jet lag when relevant). Despite the latest generation of aircraft allowing for improvements in cabin humidity, flying at cruising altitude (e.g. 38,000 feet) can still be drier than the Sahara Desert.

So how do we increase hydration while flying? Drinking water is the obvious answer, but at ISS we like to up the ante!

When it comes to drinking and flying, we tend to keep the alcohol consumption low due to its diuretic effect (meaning it actively dehydrates you). We’re also big fans of the 1Above drinks and effervescent tablets, which includes the active ingredient Pycnogenol®.

For those of you not afraid of sporting a Darth Vader look, check out the Humidiflyer mask, designed to recycle moisture in your breath to increase overall hydration. Even Australian actor and model Phoebe Tonkin thinks it's cool!

Source: Instagram

 

For more information on travel fatigue and hydration, contact us via Facebook, LinkedIn or comment below.

 

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Split shifts - who's responsible for fatigue?

Apr 20, 2017 ISS Comments (0)

It was recently reported in Australia that airport ground handling staff were concerned about their fatigue levels and the implication it could have on airport safety. Staff are reportedly sleeping in sub-optimal conditions at the airport between working split shifts.The organisation under the spotlight roster 4-hour shifts, which include early morning starts and late finishes. Due to the nature of the employees' permanent part-time contract, they are not guaranteed a predictable roster pattern. In a city like Sydney where the cost of living is extremely high, employees are staying at the airport for up to 5 hours before commencing their next shift, in order to minimise time and financial loss.

This situation raises the question - who is responsible for Fatigue Management in this safety-critical role?

To read the original news article, click here. For more information on Fatigue and Airport Safety, contact us via Facebook, LinkedIn or comment below.

 

 

 

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Fatigue at Managerial & Executive levels

Feb 21, 2017 ISS Comments (0)

Fatigue is frequently experienced by workers within many industries, at all levels. For managers and executives, arduous days, after-hours phone calls, overflowing email inboxes, and unremitting commercial pressures mean that work hours are excessively long and stressful. This can lead to unhealthy lifestyle choices including poor diet and lack of sleep in order to fulfil expectations.

Unfortunately, fatigue is seldom an issue that is discussed or taken into account at these levels of businesses. It is because excessive work is sometimes revered (despite plenty of hard evidence that it makes you less effective)? Or perhaps it is because errors made in the office don't lead to physical injuries, broken equipment or environmental spills? Another possibility is simply that managers and executives are happy to talk about topics related to high and improving performance, but not anything that might indicate they are humans and get impaired at times.  

One resource that we have found of value is a film titled ‘Grounded’, which was produced by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States. Although the film is now getting a bit dated, it still clearly illustrates how managers in the Aviation industry are just as prone to fatigue as pilots.

 


If you or your organisation is interested in reducing the risk of fatigue in office staff, including those at managerial and executive levels, please contact us or leave a comment below.

 


 

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