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The Fatigue Insider Blog

Back to work blues

Jan 09, 2019 ISS Comments (0)

For many of us, the end-of-year festive season is a busy time, catching up with friends and family, indulging in over-eating and attempting to get some much needed quality sleep! However, despite possibly sleeping more than usual, holidays can still leave you feeling tired. This is especially the case during the demanding festive season.

Aspects of the festive sleep that can affect your sleep include:

Research has shown that people often experience fatigue and stress during the holidays:


Additionally, with all the changes in sleep, alcohol and nutrition, the end of holidays marks the end of pleasant and enjoyable activities that would not usually be part of the average routine day. There could definitely be a link to how we spent our holidays, to how we cope with returning to work, and how quickly the benefits of holidays fade away.

For more information on fatigue, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.
 

 

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How much sleep do you need?

Dec 05, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Our bodies are all different, and the same rings true for our circadian rhythms. Some of us tend to be morning people, able to be wide awake and functioning at the crack of dawn. Whereas some of us tend to be night owls, able to stay up until the late hours of the night (or early morning!). However, when it comes to how much sleep one actually requires to optimally function, the range is not as big.

In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation issued its new recommendations for appropriate sleep durations all age groups.


When calculating what time to go to bed, it really comes down to your circadian rhythm. Individual’s circadian rhythm could differentiate by hours. If two people were to both go to bed at the same time, one could be sleeping at the perfect biological time and the other at an adverse biological time. Unfortunately, the easiest and best way to measure this is by testing melatonin levels through blood or saliva samples. The quality of your sleep heavily depends on the timing of sleep relative to your circadian rhythm. If you sleep at the right biological time, you'll get optimal recovery sleep. However, when you are sleeping at a non-optimal time, the quality of sleep reduces. An extreme example of this is when the circadian rhythm is disrupted, for example when jet lagged or working shift.

Our bodies respond well to routine. If you manage to find a bedtime that works best for you and achieve the amount of sleep your body requires, you might just find yourself waking up a couple of minutes before your alarm is scheduled to go off!

Join us in Singapore for our Fatigue Management & Human Factors in our 24-hour Society event in March 2019 to find out more about sleep and fatigue management. Click here for tickets and more information.

We are running a December discount offering 25% off all tickets for our blog readers (with the exception of student tickets). Please use the promotion code FatigueInsider in the site (noting that the code is case sensitive and there is no space between the two words). Don’t forget to share the code with your friends and colleagues.

Alternatively, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.


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Can cherries help you sleep?

Nov 28, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Summer is knocking on our door down here in Australia, meaning cherry season is upon us! Cherries are one of the few natural foods that contain melatonin - the hormone that regulates our circadian rhythm. Research shows that consuming foods containing melatonin increases the levels of the hormone produced by the pineal gland in our brains

So how many cherries should we be eating to aid a good night’s sleep?

Several studies have been conducted within the last two decades that have shown cherries (including juice) contain moderate to significant amounts of melatonin, helping those who suffer from insomnia or who are jet lagged.

Try a handful of cherries for an evening dessert and let us know if it works for you.

For more information on melatonin, read our previous blog post here. Alternatively, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below. 

Join us in Singapore for our Fatigue Management & Human Factors in our 24-hour Society event in March 2019 to find out more about sleep and fatigue management. Click here for tickets and more information.

We are running a December discount offering 25% off all tickets for our blog readers (with the exception of student tickets). Please use the promotion code FatigueInsider in the site (noting that the code is case sensitive and there is no space between the two words). Don’t forget to share the code with your friends and colleagues.


 

 

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Are sleeping pills a good option?

Oct 10, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Have you ever been prescribed sleeping pills? Prescription medication to aid sleep during times of transient sleep loss can provide much-needed relief. They can be quite effective at helping you fall asleep, however, if misused it is very easy to become dependent on the use of the medication, either physically or emotionally.

 

In a 2012 study, researchers compared over 10,000 people who took sleeping pills with nearly twice as many people with similar health histories who did not take sleeping pills. It was found that those who took sleeping pills were more than four times as likely to have died during the study’s 2.5-year follow-up as those who didn’t take them. While the study shows an association between sleeping pills and death, it does not prove them as the cause. The problem may lie in overuse or activities that are undertaken while experiencing the drowsy side-effects of sleeping pills, such as driving or operating heavy machinery. 

 

Sleeping pills are not the long-term answer to sleep problems and should only be used for short periods of time because of tolerance to the drug and the risk of dependency. It is important to follow the advice given to you by your doctor. Also, never take sleeping pills when travelling on aircraft. As tempting as it can be to take them to help you sleep on the plane, they effectively immobilise you, increasing the risk of DVT dramatically due to blood pooling, usually in the lower part of the body. Click on some of our older blog posts below the best tips to battle jet lag without sleeping pills:

 

High & Dry: Keeping hydrated while flying

Beware of the Dark Side: Using light to reduce jet lag

Melatonin - should you use it?

Around the world in... 52 hours?

For more information on sleeping pills, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.

 

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Fatigued cabin crew

Oct 03, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

The airline industry is a growing 24/7 operation, boasting an estimated 39 million flights to be flown worldwide by the end of 2018. Flying passengers across the country, or even across the globe, can create a variety of different challenges for cabin crew, including extended duty periods, highly variable schedules, possible frequent time zone changes, and increased passenger loads.

A study has shown a link between the job characteristics of cabin crew and fatigue. The graph below is an indication of the main work factors that contribute to fatigue amongst cabin crew workers, according to union representatives. Long hours and lack of rest are seen as the main offenders.


 

Other factors that may contribute to cabin crew fatigue include, but are not limited to:

  • Consecutive duty days
  • Length of layovers
  • Timezone changes
  • Delays
  • Availability for breaks
  • Availability of a healthy meal
  • Passenger disruption
  • Aircraft type swaps

In 2016, a bill was pass that requires airlines to provide cabin crew with a minimum 10-hour rest period between shifts, matching the requirement for pilots. The bill also included a requirement for cabin crew to be included in Fatigue Risk Management Systems, which until that point was only applied to pilots.

In Australia, there are currently no civil aviation regulations governing duty times and rest requirements for cabin crew. Their duty limitations are set contractually, and minimum standards are set by the country in which the cabin crew are employed. Cabin crew are our first responders to a safety event - is it time they are included in fatigue regulations?

Join us in Singapore for our Fatigue Management & Human Factors in our 24-hour Society event in March 2019 to find out more about fatigue management in aviation. For more information on cabin crew fatigue, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.


 

 

 

 

 

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Avoiding travel burnout

Sep 19, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

Here at ISS, we are often on the road (or in the air) travelling to meet and work with our clients. As much as our friends and family may be jealous of our frequent travels, we all know full well that it’s not a holiday! For those who travel for work, as much as we may love it, there's is no denying that travelling can be exhausting - we're yet to hear from someone who loves unpacking and repacking!

So what do we do to keep travel burnout at bay?

  • Keep up our healthy habits - Maintaining a healthy diet & increasing our hydration is really important. We often carry protein-packed snacks and keep our fluids up by drinking 1above.
  • Use supplements and equipment to help us with jet lag - we're big on using things such as melatonin, personal humidifier masks and light therapy glasses so we can hit the ground running without jet lag hitting us too hard.
  • Exercise - We always pack our joggers! It's good to get out and get some fresh air and vitamin D. This also really helps with jet lag.
  • Attempt to become a local - Before we head to our new destination, we like to research things like a go-to coffee shop, the closest gym and best places to work from remotely. This helps to feel more at home, without having to scramble to find things once we arrive. 
  • Plan our flights - Where possible, we always try to travel the most direct route. It can be very tiring having multiple and/or long layovers.
  • Take a break - It's really important to get some downtime, especially with friends and family, to feel refreshed and ready to go.
For more information on avoiding fatigue while travelling, click on the links below to some of our previous blog posts, contact us via Facebook , LinkedIn , Twitter or comment below.

Around the world in... 52 hours?

Melatonin - should you use it?

Beware of the dark side: using light to reduce jet lag

High & dry: keeping hydrated while flying

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Around the world in... 52 hours?

Feb 09, 2018 ISS Comments (0)

The team at ISS are seasoned travellers, working with clients and attending events around the globe. We may have a few around the world trips under our belts, however we certainly aren’t breaking any records like Andrew Fisher.

Andrew, an airline executive, recently circled the globe, flying 3 different airlines in a record-breaking 52 hours and 34 minutes. His trip begun in Shanghai, where he boarded a flight to Auckland, then Buenos Aires and Amsterdam before returning to Shanghai.

Having been in transit for a short total of 5.5 hours, Andrew admitted that travelling continuously is emotionally and physically taxing. When we are travelling long distances, we like to:

  • Plan our trip in a westerly direction where possible
  • Give ourselves enough downtime to shift our circadian clock once we arrive at our final destination
  • Use light and melatonin to help shift our circadian clock
  • Keep hydrated throughout our journey

For more information and tips on travelling, contact us via Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or comment below.

 

 


 

 

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