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The Fatigue Insider Blog

Are sleep pods the answer to a stressful office?

Feb 05, 2020 ISS Comments (0)

The increase of sleep pods and relaxation rooms in offices, ostensibly introduced to combat increased stress and fatigue among employees, may actually be fuelling a 24-hour working culture.
 
In recognition of the importance of sleep, innovative companies like Google, Nike, and Hootsuite have all invested in napping pods and rooms in an attempt to boost productivity. Although it can be hard to work out whether these efforts are in the best interest of employees’ health and wellbeing or suggest an expectation that employees will be spending much more of their time in the office.
 
While napping for 10 to 20 minutes has been shown to increase alertness, it can also delay the onset of sleep later in the night. As such, the provision of facilities for employees to nap can be extremely important for those doing shift work; but for those doing traditional 9 to 5 jobs, napping could just disrupt circadian rhythms and encourage employees to work longer hours.
 
If employees in corporate environments who aren’t working shifts are so tired that they require naps throughout the day, there may be deeper issues present related to workplace culture and expectations of productivity that need to be addressed. It is important for employees to be able to fully switch off from work for a reasonable amount of time each day in order for them to deliver peak performance long-term.

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Should truck drivers be tested for sleep apnea?

Jan 15, 2020 ISS Comments (0)

 

The results of a 2018 survey found that half of commercial truck drivers suffer from breathing disorders that could make them more susceptible to falling asleep at the wheel. This startling insight, gained through a survey of over 900 Italian truck drivers, has prompted many to call for routine testing of breathing disorders, particularly obstructive sleep apnoea.
 
Luca Roberti, in response to this survey, made an appeal to European haulage companies in a presentation at the European Respiratory Society international congress, “considering that drivers are in charge of transport vehicles weighing several tons, companies have a great moral and civic responsibility to ensure their employees are safe to drive and are not at risk of suddenly falling asleep at the wheel.”
 
Similar statistics have been recorded in an Australian context, with a study in Sleep found that 41% of truck drivers suffer from OSA. Some of the contributing factors to this are the demography of Australian truck drivers, who are overwhelmingly male, overweight or obese, and 40+, all of which a risk factors for the development of OSA.
 
Research has shown that a driver who is deprived of sleep due to OSA may be up to 12 times more likely to be involved in a driving accident.
 
The good news is that routine screenings followed by appropriate treatment can be a highly effective way to address this issue. A 2016 study in the Journal of Sleep Medicine showed that truck drivers with OSA who receive treatment for two years may be able to reduce their crash-risk to that of truck drivers without OSA.
 
You can access the article “Assessing sleepiness and sleep disorders in Australian long-distance commercial vehicle drivers: self-report versus an “at home” monitoring device” in Sleep here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3296788/
 
You can access the article “Screening, diagnosis, and management of obstructive sleep apnea in dangerous-goods truck drivers: to be aware or not?” in the Journal of Sleep Medicine here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2016.05.015

 

 

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New Year’s resolutions: Is sleep the new fitness?

Jan 01, 2020 ISS Comments (0)

 

 

We hope that everyone had a fantastic New Year’s Eve! We are heading into a packed 2020 feeling refreshed and ready to work harder than ever.

Every New Year’s Day, we pledge that this is the year that we get in shape, and we go out in droves to purchase gym memberships and start new diets. Flash forward to a month later, and most of us are back into our packed daily lives with no time to stick to our fitness goals. This year, we’re focusing on our wellbeing by resolving to get a good night’s sleep. In other words, 2020 is the year for sleep to finally become the new fitness!

The world is finally waking up to the fact that when it comes to physical fitness, sleep is just as important as physical exercise and a good diet.
 
Sleep helps you maintain a healthy weight
Just like a good diet and exercise, getting the proper amount of sleep is an essential component of reaching or maintaining a healthy weight. Without sleep, your metabolism could be negatively affected, making it more difficult for you to process insulin. You are also less likely to snack irresponsibly if you are well-rested.
 
Sleep helps you manage stress and anxiety
Stress and anxiety are issues that most people will have to face at some point, but getting sufficient sleep is key in both dealing with and preventing anxiety from negatively affecting your life. Without sleep, you will find that your body will go into a state of stress. The body produces more stress hormones like cortisol, which will make it more difficult to fall asleep in the future.
 
Sleep helps you fight off depression
Studies have shown that depression may both cause and be caused by sleep disorders, so getting your sleeping habits in check is key for managing your mental health. Just as regular exercising helps to increase emotional resilience, proper sleep hygiene contributes to improved mood and resilience.
 
Sleep helps you live longer
All sorts of diseases have been linked to sleep deprivation, including cancer, type 2 diabetes, the worsening of blood pressure and higher levels of cholesterol, all of which are risk factors for heart disease and stroke. The good news is that getting enough sleep is a fantastic first line of defence against these conditions and will promote overall health.
 
Sleep reduces inflammation
Exercising and laying off unhealthy foods won’t be enough to reduce inflammation in isolation; sleeping is also key. If you sleep less than six hours a night, your blood levels of inflammatory proteins may be higher than people who sleep more. Heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis and premature aging all have strong ties to inflammation, so reducing it is essential for overall wellbeing.
 
With all the reasons that sleep is important to a healthy lifestyle, it makes sense to plan around sleep the same way that you would make plans for physical exercise and diet in 2020.

 

 

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Give yourself the gift of sleep this holiday season

Dec 25, 2019 ISS Comments (0)

The holiday season may be a magical time to catch up with old friends, visit with family and enjoy holiday parties, but it can also be a time of significant stress, sleep deprivation, and habits that can damage our health and immune system. It’s important to prioritise staying as well rested and healthy as possible during the festive season.
 
We tend to overindulge on alcohol during this period, whether that be due to of end of year festivities or to deal with our relatives. While it is best to limit alcohol consumption, if you do partake, try to wait a couple of hours before you go to bed to get the best sleep possible.
 
The same can be said for food, as we tend to overstuff ourselves and go for more sweets than usual. If you can, reserve your overeating for specific meals and occasions, rather than falling off the wagon completely and having to work it off as part of your New Year’s resolutions. Eating heavy or sugary meals at night will negatively affect your ability to sleep, so try to leave a significant amount of time between eating and bedtime.
 
Even though you might be dealing with some end-of-year burnout, and even the ability to take naps while you have less work obligations, try to avoid sleeping too much, as it will just make you more tired. If you do feel the need to have an after-lunch food coma nap, try to keep it to 20 minutes or less.
 
It can be a really stressful time, so try to fit in things that provide some relief from all the hustle and bustle. This could be doing some exercise, meditation, or whatever makes you happiest. We hope that you all have a very happy holiday season!

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Sleeping habits around the world

Oct 23, 2019 ISS Comments (0)


While we live in an increasingly globalised world, people still tend to sleep very differently in different countries. The diversity of sleeping habits around the world can reflect attitudes towards health, work-life balance, relationship to the environment, and a myriad of other cultural values. Check out some of the unusual and interesting ways people sleep, it may even introduce you to a new habit to incorporate into your own bedtime routine.

 
Japan
In Japan, the habit of falling asleep in public, whether that is on the train or even in the middle of a meeting, is actually revered. Called inemuri, or ‘sleeping while present,’ it is a sign that people have worked themselves so hard that they have exhausted themselves. It may be praised as a sign of a person’s industriousness.
 
Botswana and Zaire
Members of the !Kung tribe and the Efe tribe, hunter-gatherers from Botswana and Zaire respectively, sleep when they feel tired. This could be at any time of day for any length of time, rather than in recurring blocks. While this system may not be fully compatible with current expectations in Western countries, the act of listening to your body to give it the sleep it needs is a sure-fire way to prevent fatigue.
 
Spain and Latin America
The popularity of the famous siesta has waned in recent years as Spain has become more urbanised. Nevertheless, an afternoon rest break, especially when kept short, can improve productivity. Interestingly, the afternoon power nap has sprung up in Silicon Valley, where employees are encouraged to use sleep pods to help them remain refreshed.
 
Australia
Some Aboriginal peoples practice co-sleeping, where they line up their mattresses or swags in a line called a ‘yunta.’ This practice can maximise the safety of the group, especially by protecting the most vulnerable members sleeping in the centre.

China

 In China, it’s a popular belief that a firm bed supports the alignment of the back, promoting better sleep, a belief shared by many around the world. Some Chinese factories have also been blurring the lines between workplace and bedroom, encouraging employees to utilise in-house sleeping and washing facilities to maximise productivity.

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Back to work blues

Jan 09, 2019 ISS Comments (0)

For many of us, the end-of-year festive season is a busy time, catching up with friends and family, indulging in over-eating and attempting to get some much needed quality sleep! However, despite possibly sleeping more than usual, holidays can still leave you feeling tired. This is especially the case during the demanding festive season.

Aspects of the festive sleep that can affect your sleep include:

Research has shown that people often experience fatigue and stress during the holidays:


Additionally, with all the changes in sleep, alcohol and nutrition, the end of holidays marks the end of pleasant and enjoyable activities that would not usually be part of the average routine day. There could definitely be a link to how we spent our holidays, to how we cope with returning to work, and how quickly the benefits of holidays fade away.

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